Photo Finish – Washington State Memories!

I officially have no domicile! The moving crew was amazing and finished quickly Tuesday, allowing me to clean the house and turn in my keys 48 hours early! However, I’m still sticking around until Saturday anyway so I can enjoy a final dinner with my good friends Friday night.

I’ve focused my lens on our mountains, waterfalls, and volcanoes in these recent retrospective remembrances recalling the radically righteous sights I’ve seen, but there’s more to this state than waterfalls or mountains that go “Boom!”

Please take a shot tour of some of the other fun sights I’ve experienced since my first visit back in 2018!

Burgers Landing does a very convincing imitation of being an airplane ready to take off! The facade was actually built by the uncle of my best friend, Ian Carver. Port Hadlock, Washington. (Nathanael Miller, 05 September 2018)
Born sometime around 1786, Seattle was one of the greatest chiefs of the Suquamish and Duwamish tribes. He died in 1866. The city of Seattle, Washington, is named in his honor. Suquamish, Washington. (Nathanael Miller, 05 September 2018)
A unique way to catch fish! Pike Place’s fish vendors are famous for the show they put on by tossing fish back and forth while stocking their their display cases. Pike Place Market opened in 1907. It has over 500 vendors in 8 buildings, and currently ranks as the 33rd most popular tourist destination in the world. Seattle, Washington. (Nathanael Miller, 30 September 2018)
Seattle, Washington. (9 July 2019; Nathanael Miller)
The Space Needle from an angle not usually seen. Seattle, Washington. (9 July 2019; Nathanael Miller)
The MV Tacoma, launched in 1997. The Tacoma, Wenatchee, and the Puyallup are Jumbo Mark II-class ferries, the largest in the Washington State Ferry fleet. Seattle, Washington. (13 Oct. 2019; Nathanael Miller)
The Seattle Aquarium opened in 1977 on Pier 59. Seattle, Washington. (13 Oct. 2019; Nathanael Miller)
The Seattle Aquarium opened in 1977 on Pier 59. Seattle, Washington. (13 Oct. 2019; Nathanael Miller)
High Steel Bridge in the Olympic National Forest, carrying Forest Service Road 2202, was built in 1929 by Simpson Logging Company as a railroad bridge. It is the tallest the bridge in the state of Washington, crossing over 400 feet above the Skokomish River’s south fork for a length of 685 feet. It was discontinued as a railroad bridge in 1950 and converted for vehicular traffic in 1964. (Nathanael Miller, 28 July 2020)
High Steel Bridge. (Nathanael Miller, 28 July 2020)
This view is from along the starboard wing. The fuselage would have sat in the gap between the wings. The wreckage is pointing downhill; the nose of the plane would be out of the frame to the right if it still existed. SB-17, bureau number 44-85746, was completed as a B-17G Flying Fortress and accepted by the Army Air Force in May 1945, but did not see combat in World War II. The aircraft was converted into a search and rescue SB-17. The aircraft’s port wing clipped mountain top trees on Mt. Tyler during blizzard conditions, bringing it down on January 19, 1952. The plane slid 2,000 feet down the mountain into Tull Canyon. Three of the eight crew were killed; the other five were rescued by helicopter the next day. Tull Canyon, Buckhorn Wilderness. Olympic Peninsula, Washington State. (Nathanael Miller, 29 July 2020)
Starboard main mount landing gear. This wheel would retract into the #3 engine nacelle if the nacelle still existed. SB-17, bureau number 44-85746, was completed as a B-17G Flying Fortress and accepted by the Army Air Force in May 1945, but did not see combat in World War II. The aircraft was converted into a search and rescue SB-17. The aircraft’s port wing clipped mountain top trees on Mt. Tyler during blizzard conditions, bringing it down on January 19, 1952. The plane slid 2,000 feet down the mountain into Tull Canyon. Three of the eight crew were killed; the other five were resuced by helicopter the next day. Tull Canyon, Buckhorn Wilderness. Olympic Peninsula, Washington State. (Nathanael Miller, 29 July 2020)
Wildflowers! Bluebells and other wildflowers bloom under Yakima Peak. Yakima Peak rises to 6,226-ft (1,898 m) and overlooks Tipsoo Lake, just located just inside the eastern boundary of Mount Rainier National Park. Mount Rainier is the highest peak of the Cascade volcanoes, rising 14,411 feet above sea level. It is also considered one of the most dangerous volcanoes in North America. Mount Rainier National Park Washington. (11 Aug. 2020; Nathanael Miller)
Bluebells, at Tipsoo Lake. Mount Rainier National Park Washington. (11 Aug. 2020; Nathanael Miller)

#nathanaelmiller; #sparks1524; #WashingtonState; #guerrillaphotojournalist; #exploreamerica; #beautifuldestinations

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